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In a sense the Levant is one immense archaeological site. It is not possible for us to provide details on all the important sites let alone all sites. So, we decided to begin with some sites to which we have taken student groups as part of their study of archaeology and the Bible. We will branch out as we have the time and resources.

The archaeology of the New Testament refers to the excavation, preservation, and analysis of the material culture of biblical peoples during the New Testament period (ca. 4 BCE-CE 135). This, of course, entails the study of socio-cultural systems outside the Levant including Asia Minor, Greece, Rome, and even as far as Spain and Roman Britain. See for Academics for more information about how you can enroll in an online university course on archaeology and the New Testament.

The archaeology of the Hebrew Scriptures, that of the Old Testament in Christian terminology, refers to that of the Tanakh. Interestingly, some Israeli archaeologists narrowly construe biblical archaeology to be that of the Hebrew Scriptures. We, of course, disagree preferring a much broader focus. See for Academics for more information about how you can enroll in an online university course on archaeology and the Old Testament.


Page last edited: 02/12/09 06:51 AM

 


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